Saturday, 28 April 2018

A #SixonSaturday of Few Words




Garden twine washed, dried, not folded.

If there's no rest for the wicked, what's the state of the average gardener's soul?

This week's seen Freecycling of surplus plants, repotting tenders whose roots slithered into view, training roses & peas to cherish their supports, not checking my pockets before doing the laundry, & yes, I admit it, planting out my French beans.

That French bean impatience alone reveals the state of my soul.



There are readers who'll be glad to know I've little energy left for words this week.  So without further yammering, I give you El Punko's photos.


1.  New growth on the fatsia.



Spider web fatsia survived the beast.


2.  Woody strutting his stuff.



New fronds on the Woodwardia have a nice red tint . . .



. . . that fades in close-up.


3.  Blue daddy beginning to open.



Slightly nibbled hosta.


4.  Long awaited akebia action.



Blooms I thought would be blue . . .



. . . and bigger . . .


5.  Old friend returns.



 . . . but the Carolina allspice just as I remembered.


6.  Another 'free gift' daffodil.



Day 1 . . .



. . . & dust inside the camera.



Next day . . . 



. . . with the phone camera.



Crooked cherry now has self-seeded valerian in bloom.




So there's my #SixonSaturday.

The Propagator hosts this gardening meme. 

Follow the link to his Six with a comment section overrun by other SoS bloggers. 

And if you have a garden, why not post your own Six so we all can have a peek?

Thanks for stopping by.

P.S.  Have I ever said that this crooked cherry is my absolutely favourite tree? 

No? 

You'd think I'd post its photo more often.

See you next week!

22 comments:

  1. I'm really going to have to get a couple of unusual daffodils after seeing your "free gift" one! It looks nothing like I'd expect a daffodil to look, and seeing as "unusual" is the best way to describe most of my house plants, it's probably about time I had at least one unusual plant in the garden)

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    1. I'm really pleased w/my free gift daffs. While I have about half a dozen of the previous one, this is the only one of this particular daff. Now I have to remember who sent them to me & browse their site for names.

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  2. What? No quirky chat and inane wittering? Nice seeing old friends again and I do like that Fatsia. I gave one to a client and put it in a very shady, sheltered spot where it is loving life.

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    1. I managed to squeeze several words into the photo captions.

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  3. My Akebia flowers had this color a few weeks ago and time after time they have changed in a darker one... You will tell me if I'm right. ( PS : lovely picture of this daffodil.... it makes me want to smell it ... ! )

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    1. It smells almost like honeysuckle.

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    2. Really? I would say vanilla for mine ... if only I could have 1 fruit to test ... I pollinate the flowers every day with a brush ... why not ?!)

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    3. I meant the daffodil. The akebia flowers are too high for me to smell. I'll have to wait until the lower ones blooms & report back to you, as well as how the colour goes. I really hope you get a fruit, though. How cool would that be?

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    4. Ah excuse me... I thought about akebia... always akebia, sorry. I keep you all posted about my success for having a fruit. (��)

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  4. That is a most unusual non-daffodil-like daffodil. Maybe it's trying to be an unusual non-tulip-like tulip as most posts today give the impression that at least one tulip is de rigueur (OK, you and I are rebels). And thanks for the reminder (off to scatter a few organic slug pellets around my hostas now).

    PS. Yes (now) :-)

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    1. My tulips are nearly done, but also very blase. As to slugs, I tried Fred's pine needle (ok, cedar bough) idea, but it didn't work. As can be seen. Blue Daddy must be too delicious.

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  5. I have two Fatsias, one of which I tried to kill, and they seem to have amazing regenerative powers. They have now grown on me (forgive the pun).

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    1. They're new to me, so we're still getting to know each other. I'm glad to see this one come back. Are yours in pots or in the ground?

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  6. Lovely to see all this fresh growth! And I do enjoy a bit of time-lapse photography!

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    1. With our recent heat wave, the garden's really taken off. This week, it's cold coming, so we'll see who survives it.

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  7. I always look forward to your yammering but very happy to see such a lovely range of plants again. That Akebia may be small but oh how beautiful. Let's see if Fred is right about the colour - he usually is...

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    1. I'm sure Fred's right, & also am hoping he gets some fruit out of his. Regardless, I do love my akebia. The foliage is so beautiful, as are the blooms. Just have to get really, really close to see them.

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  8. What a stunning daff!So lovely to see a waking-up garden, isn't it?

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    1. It's happened so quickly, too. Magic.

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  9. Ooh. Akebia. New one on me, always on the lookout for a new climber. There's always a spot of fence that needs covering...

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    1. Fred is trying for fruit on his. The foliage & flowers are both delicate & beautiful. Also fast growing & tolerates shade but loves sun, so a plant for lots of spots in the garden.

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  10. All is good, all is growing, horrah!

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